© 2016 Karissa Chen all rights reserved.

What ​

 

listens to while writing.

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[ a r t i c l e s ]

[ Eater | March 6, 2019 ]

Excerpt:

To get just about anywhere in Taiwan outside of Taipei, you’ll probably need to travel by train. Taiwan boasts a large and efficient rail network that’s accustomed to serving tourists and commuters alike, from those looking to get to beaches in the south or rice-field villages in the east to those who simply need to head into the city for work. Some destinations can take up to eight hours to reach, and few trains sport dining cars, so the meal of choice for many riders has become the train bento.

[ Eater | March 6, 2019 ]

Excerpt:

AAD feels like the cooler cousin of popular indoor markets like Nanmen, where locals go to purchase produce, pick up seafood, or get meat butchered to order. Inside is spacious but warm, with wood paneling and brown tones accenting everything from the countertops to the beams criss-crossing the tin roofing; pastels on chalkboards describe the day’s specials. Outside, the outdoor eating areas’ greenery and the Edison bulb-filled candelabra centerpieces borrow heavily from hipster beer gardens elsewhere in the world. But with a large food emporium, a standing sushi bar, and a seasonal hot pot restaurant, AAD is unquestionably influenced by the sensibilities of the Taiwanese.

[ New York Public Library | May 30, 2017 ]

Excerpt:

In general, I feel ambivalent towards lists of this sort, which, while handy for quick recommendations, are also by their nature exclusionary. A list of Asian American books, therefore, is further complicated by the fact that Asian American stories are already underrepresented in the industry, making it hard not to feel that any list focusing on Asian American writers might hold a disproportionate importance in terms of offering visibility to particular titles. In the face of this added pressure of representation, when tasked with creating a list, I inevitably feel guilty that I will have to leave off so many noteworthy books.

[ Audible Range | February 24, 2017 ]

Excerpt:

With this rise in popularity, it might be tempting to compare the works of Chinese science fiction writers alongside those by Asian-American authors, particularly those who belong to the ethnic Chinese diaspora (it’s important to note that not all Asian-Americans with ethnic Chinese heritage identify as Chinese-American). But does that make sense? Asian-American writers, by and large, are educated in the traditional British-American literary canon, after all. Even while some might have been influenced by the histories and mythologies of their ethnic background, these are American writers who grew up reading the likes of Isaac Asimov, Philip K. Dick, and Ursula K. LeGuin, and so in their own writing, they are often in conversation with those traditions, emulating and renegotiating the tropes, styles, and conventions of Western science fiction.

[ Hyphen | December 25, 2016 ]

Excerpt:

In a year in which there was so much to cry about in real life, this felt even more important. Our world feels so divided these days, so focused on the ways in which we are suspicious of others, on the differences that we might never be able to overcome. Harm continues to be wrought by the powerful on the weak and voiceless. And yet fiction brings us into the psyches all kinds of people, offering them a grace that is often hard to find amidst the senseless violence and tragedy of the real world. It used to be that all the books I read required me to empathize with people completely unlike myself; now, as APIA fiction continues to flourish in all of its diversity, I get to read books where certain cultural, psychological, and historical markers might be familiar to me. More and more, I feel seen as I read fiction, and that offers me hope. Not just because of the many APIA readers who might feel a sense of validation in having their experiences and histories reflected back at them, but also because someone not APIA might read these books and feel moved by them too. Maybe when we read together, we change together. Maybe that's part of how we make this world just a tiny bit better.

[ The Brooklyn Rail | November 5, 2013 ]

A review of Colin McAdam's A Beautiful Truth

Excerpt:

By the end of the book, Looee felt like my child, the injured, misunderstood kid I wanted to hug and assure things would be okay. The kid I wanted to protect and take under my wing. But of course I couldn’t—one, because he’s fictional, and two, because he’s a chimp—and this feeling haunted me for days. I don’t know which reason frustrated me more, but both possibilities pointed to the fact that McAdam has written an unforgettable book, one that, remarkably, had me thinking less about how human chimps can be, and more about what that word “human” even means.

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